At Adaptive Minds, we have extensive training and experience in working with anxiety and promoting optimal performance. As such, we specialize in the following areas:
  • General Anxiety and Worry
  • Panic
  • Anxiety Surrounding Performance, Tests, and School
  • Stress
  • Enhancing Sports, School, and Work Performance
  • Promoting Positive Emotion and Well-Being
  • Mental Toughness Training
  • Health and Wellness Coaching


Additionally, Adaptive Minds service providers have significant training and experience in the following service areas:
  • Motivation to Change and Improving Life Choices for Young Adults
  • Assertiveness
  • Addiction
  • Problem-Solving
  • Self-Esteem
  • Depression
  • Anger
  • Identity
  • Changes Surrounding Lifestyle, Diet, and Exercise
  • Relationship Challenges


Adaptive Minds counsellors employ the following approaches in helping you to achieve your goals and live your life in a way that is consistent with your values:

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

Cognitive-behavioral therapy is an evidence-based treatment approach for many psychological issues such as anxiety, depression, anger, and stress. Cognitive-behavioral approaches to treatment typically include three components 1) identifying, evaluating, and replacing unhelpful or inaccurate thoughts and beliefs 2) problem-solving, conditioning behaviors, and promoting positive activity and 3) strategies for directly managing emotions and body responses, such as breathing and relaxation. The goal of cognitive therapy is to reduce distress and promote adaptive thinking, belief systems, and behavior. If you are looking for a treatment strategy that has been well-researched and shown to be effective for many issues, this approach may be right for you.


Acceptance and Commitment Therapy

Acceptance and commitment therapy is also an evidence-based treatment approach for many different psychological issues. Acceptance and commitment therapy involves four primary components 1) defusing from harmful thoughts and interpretations of our experiences 2) accepting, rather than fighting, our natural cognitive, physical, and emotional experiences 3) awareness and connection with the here-and-now and 4) choosing behaviors that are consistent with one's values, regardless of one's current emotional experience. Unlike cognitive therapy, the goal of acceptance and commitment therapy is not primarily to reduce distress. Instead, acceptance and commitment therapy aims to promote psychological flexibility and engagement in a life that is meaningful. Paradoxically, this approach often leads to a reduction in distress, as individuals reduce the frequency with which they judge, and fight with, their cognitive and emotional experiences. If you have had thoughts, images, or emotions that you have tried hard to get rid of, only to see them come back stronger, this approach could be a good fit for you.


Positive Psychotherapy

Positive psychotherapy is based on the philosophy that there is more to living a good life than alleviating distress and reducing unpleasant emotions like anxiety, depression, and stress. This therapeutic approach takes the perspective that within psychotherapy, historically, there has been too much emphasis placed on reducing distress and not enough of a focus on promoting the factors that lead to happiness, well-being, and a high quality of life. As such, positive psychotherapy interventions do not focus directly on distress, but instead aim to promote five domains of well-being 1) happiness and positive emotions 2) engagement in life 3) positive relationships 4) meaningful activities and 5) positive accomplishment. Many clients value positive psychotherapy interventions because they seek services hoping to have happier and more meaningful lives and not just reduce feelings of stress, anxiety, or depression. If your primary goal is to improve your happiness and well-being, ask about this approach.


Sports Psychology Interventions and Mental Skills Training

Sports psychology and mental skills training interventions have been directly designed to enhance individuals' abilities to perform at their best by helping them to enter into an optimal psychological, emotional, and physical state during their respective performances. Examples of areas that these interventions might target include, stress management, emotional and physiological control, thought control, motivation, confidence, handling injury, interpersonal skills, and leadership. The techniques used in sport psychology interventions and mental skills training are often similar to those utilized in cognitive-behavioral therapy; but, the focus is more on improving performance than on reducing distress. If you are aiming to improve your performance in sport, work, or another domain, these strategies may be right for you.


Coaching Services

Coaching services are for individuals who consider themselves emotionally and psychologically well and are aimed at helping people to enhance their motivation, make changes, and move forwards towards what is important in their lives. Coaching services can be particularly helpful in building skills, establishing goals, identifying and addressing internal and external obstacles to goals, and developing an effective plan of action. At Adaptive Minds, we specialize in overall life coaching, as well as optimal performance coaching.

At Adaptive Minds, we have extensive training and experience in working with anxiety and promoting optimal performance. As such, we specialize in the following areas: General Anxiety and Worry, Panic, Anxiety Surrounding Performance, Tests, and School, Stress, Enhancing Sports, School, and Work Performance, Promoting Positive Emotion and Well-Being, Mental Toughness Training. Cognitive-behavioral therapy is an evidence-based treatment approach for many psychological issues such as anxiety, depression, anger, and stress. Cognitive-behavioral approaches typically include tools for challenging and replacing unhelpful thoughts and beliefs, strategies for problem-solving and promoting positive activities, and methods for directly managing emotions and body responses. The goal of cognitive therapy is to reduce distress and promote adaptive thinking, belief systems, and behavior. Unlike other forms of therapy, the goal of acceptance and commitment therapy is not primarily to reduce distress. Instead, acceptance and commitment therapy aims to promote psychological flexibility and engagement in a life that is meaningful. Paradoxically, this approach often leads to a reduction in distress, as individuals’ reduce the frequency with which they judge, and fight with, their cognitive and emotional experiences.